In the Wake of a Hurricane: Daniel Doyle and Operation BBQ Relief

 photo: courtesy of daniel doyle

photo: courtesy of daniel doyle

Growing up Southern, hurricanes are a part of life. You know the season, the categories, and you know that just because you can’t see the ocean does not mean you won’t see a hurricane’s effects. But things have changed in the past few years -- it feels like it’s become more about capturing those ratings rather than sharing realistic information, and so things are beginning to skew. Not only are we getting more powerful storms as climate change becomes apparent, we’re wondering whose information to trust when politics, ratings, and even the business economy of storm prep is all playing a bigger and bigger part. Then, after the storm, many of us that didn’t get hit -- and that’s most of us -- send thoughts and prayers yet feel overwhelmed and drained by the enormity of fear we just experienced. Fear, more than anything, makes you catatonic, unable to see a way. My job today is to counter that helplessness by helping you hear another side. The helpers are still out there, some of them cook food, and the following is one of their stories. Chef Daniel Doyle of Poogan’s Porch and Poogan’s Smokehouse in Charleston joined Operation BBQ Relief after Hurricane Florence. He saw hive mentality at work and became a worker bee in that hive, all by just showing up and making spaghetti. This is his story from the front lines, and as you listen, please remember that Operation BBQ Relief is mobilizing in Florida today in the wake of another devastating storm.

Episode 117 ›

 

 

Cameron Read, Edmund’s Oast Brewing Co. (Charleston, SC)

 photo: edmund’s Oast

photo: edmund’s Oast

If you’ve ever been on untapped, rate my beer, or otherwise thought about standing in line for a beer release, then listen up, beloved beer nerds, this episode is for you! Cameron Read is the Director of Brewing Operations for Edmund’s Oast Brewing Company in Charleston, SC, and so yes, he just might have what many consider to be a dream job. Edmund’s Oast is becoming a force in brewing in the US, not only with its connections to get rare and special releases for the restaurant, but now through its own beer since recently adding a canning and bottling operation. But the following isn’t a chat about the business side, but about brewing, from gauges and yeast to the creative process of building flavors and what Cameron likes to call “dialing in.” From brewing in his apartment before he was of legal age to consume it, to these days running a 30-barrel system, he still closely guards the creative process that got him there -- making beer.

Episode 118 >

BJ Dennis, Chef (Charleston, SC)

 photo: courtesy of bj dennis

photo: courtesy of bj dennis

Listen to the lilt of this Lowcountry accent. Chef BJ Dennis is Gullah Geechie, part of the descendants of Central and West Africans who came from different ethnic and social groups. Originally enslaved together on the isolated sea and barrier islands from Pender County, North Carolina to St. John’s County, Florida and for 30 miles inland, over time, these people developed the creole Gullah Geechee language as a means of communicating with each other. What you’re hearing is that history coming through in every syllable. If you’ve been to this part of the country, then perhaps you know about the musical traditions, the baskets, and maybe even the paint colors, but did you know about Gullah Geechie cuisine? BJ is on his personal journey to discover his roots through food, and he’s inviting us to join him with every plate. You might have seen him on Fine Cooking’s Moveable Feast, in the New York Times, or at many a special event or food festival, but here he sits down with me to ponder his past -- and consider his next steps.

Episode  119 >